Trump administration to try more aggressive approach to deport illegal immigrants with criminal records

The Venezuelans left in limbo by new US immigration plan

FILE – In this Aug. 31, 2017 file photo, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention center in Brownsville, Texas, is seen from a helicopter. The Trump administration is taking a new tack in its crackdown on illegal immigration, but at least in one corner of the United States, people are being deported and their fate uncertain. The administration is removing a controversial policy that allows more federal jail inmates to go free, giving them work permits and temporary stays in the country. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

In this Aug. 31, 2017 file photo, a sign hangs in the lobby of the immigration detention center in Brownsville, Texas, about to be released. The Trump administration is taking a new tack in its crackdown on illegal immigration, but at least in one corner of the United States, people are being deported and their fate uncertain. The administration is removing a controversial policy that allows more federal jail inmates to go free, giving them work permits and temporary stays in the country. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

FILE – In this Aug. 31, 2017 file photo, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention center in Brownsville, Texas, is seen from a helicopter. The Trump administration is taking a new tack in its crackdown on illegal immigration, but at least in one corner of the United States, people are being deported and their fate uncertain. The administration is removing a controversial policy that allows more federal jail inmates to go free, giving them work permits and temporary stays in the country. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

DETROIT – A top Trump administration official says his agency will try a more aggressive approach to deport illegal immigrants with criminal records. ICE and the Justice Department are expected to seek the deportation of some people with criminal records who have been ordered removed.

The move could affect thousands of people who live in South Florida, where a judge in January told the government to remove a man who had been ordered deported after being convicted of sex crimes. It could also change the immigration status of thousands with criminal records in parts of Georgia, Maryland, New York and Washington, D.C.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director Thomas Homan said the deportation would be “tougher” than the previous policy in that it will include those who were not convicted

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