Author: Linda

The Best Leader in the Senate

The Best Leader in the Senate

Letters to the Editor: The simple reason Republicans picked Herschel Walker — celebrity, sportsman, politician, and all-around winner-take-all winner — for the 1988 U.S. Senate nomination was that he was the best of the Republican ticket.

Walker was the most conservative, the most pro-American, the best man for the job. The Democrat — Jimmy Carter — would be, if not a national embarrassment, then a national embarrassment. And Republicans ran a presidential candidate who, though brilliant and a formidable and able speaker, was a moderate on other issues.

Since that time, Republicans have picked four senators each election year to be their choice for the Senate seat. They have failed, though, to recognize that what makes a good senator is not just the fact that he is a good and loyal Democrat but the fact that he is the best leader of the party. There was, of course, George McGovern — a wonderful and wonderful and wonderful man. And then there was Robert Byrd, who was an able and effective chairman of the Democratic caucus. He is still a superb and effective chairman of the Democratic caucus.

To be the best leader in the Democratic caucus, the Senate president should be the best of the four — or five, if there are three and a half more that the Senate president can vote on — the leading man in the party.

Herschel Walker was the best of the four. He was the leading man of the Democratic caucus.

The other three were Joe Biden, Dennis Hastert, and Dick Morris.

Joe Biden is a fine and capable and honest man who does not give a damn what people think of him. He is the best in the Senate.

Dennis Hastert — he is a great senator, but he is not a great man. He is a great senator who is not a great man.

In the Senate, the leader, the most important leader, is on the other side. Joe Biden is on the other side.

Dick Morris is one of the better Senate president. The other three are not.

In the Senate, where you need to get

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