Author: Linda

California will not see its first-ever November rainstorm since 1962

California will not see its first-ever November rainstorm since 1962

The latest U.S. winter outlook spells trouble for dry California.

The map below shows the latest outlook from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which is used by U.S. forecasters to predict the likelihood of precipitation events ranging from heavy snows to record-breaking rains.

The map shows a trend line for snowfall events that has not changed since December 2014, according to the agency. The green line represents a 75 percent chance of snowfall events throughout the winter, with the red line representing a 50 percent chance.

The purple line indicates a winter precipitation total of 20 to 30 inches, with 10 to 20 inches being less likely, but the blue line representing a 10- to 20-inch total, which is not very likely.

The map also confirms the forecast for the snowiest month, along with the forecast for the state’s driest month.

If we continue with the current trend, then there is a 70 percent chance of more than an inch of precipitation (18.5 inches) on average for January 2018.

That puts California at the bottom of the list of the three states on the continent that are expected to break rainfall records in November 2018.

Nevada will see its 10.0 inches, and Washington will be at 13.5 inches.

Here’s what this means for California.

For the third-coldest January on record, California has a 70 percent chance of making the top 10.

And here’s what that means:

The state will not see its first-ever November rainstorm since 2012, and the last time it rained in November was the final week of 2011.

For the third-longest snow event on record, California will have its lowest snow total since 1958.

And here’s what that means:

The state will not see its first-ever December snowstorm since 1962.

The state will not see its last snowstorm before a new moon since 1976.

And here’s what that means:

The state will not have its snowiest January since 1978.

This is a message for Californians.

In these long-term forecast models, it is looking more and more as though a late-season heat wave is likely to put a major dent

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